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Exploring the Power of the Jigsaw Cooperative Learning Method: Unlocking Academic Success


The jigsaw teaching strategy is a cooperative learning technique developed by Elliot Aronson and his colleagues in the 1970s. The Jigsaw strategy is designed to promote student cooperation and communication by requiring them to work together to master a particular subject or topic.


Evidence suggests that several facets of education can benefit from cooperative learning strategies, most notably the Jigsaw method.  Research has demonstrated that students' mathematical self-efficacy, mathematical connection ability, learning outcomes, interest in subjects, and academic achievement can be improved through the implementation of Jigsaw cooperative learning. These results provide more evidence that Jigsaw method is beneficial for students across all grade levels and subjects. Better learning outcomes are the result of increased student engagement, active learning, and collaboration. Teachers can greatly benefit their students' learning experiences and outcomes by implementing Jigsaw cooperative learning into their lesson plans.


A. Regular Jigsaw


Step 1: Preparation of information or material for learning.

 

  • The teacher prepares the information or materials to be studied.

  • The information to be studied is divided into four parts. It is supposed that each cooperative group has four members.

  • The material is labeled: #1, #2, #3, #4

  • In each cooperative group of four members, everyone is assigned one part of the information.

 

Step 2: Individual students work on their assigned material.


  •  Each student reads their information.

  • The student decides on the necessary details from the material.

 

Step 3: Students teach.

 

  • The student decides the best way to teach the information to his group members.

  • The student has up to 2 minutes to share what they learned from the material.

 

Step 3: Assessment

 

Here, the teacher decides how to assess the student's learning. The teacher can ask questions or use any other forms of assessment.


B. Group Jigsaw


Step 1: Preparation of information or material for learning

 

  • The teacher divides the information to be learned into several organized cooperative groups.

  • The teacher labels the material. At this level, the material or information to be studied is numbered according to the number of organized groups: Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and so forth.

  • Each cooperative group is assigned one part of the information.

 

Step 2: Cooperative groups work 

 

  • Each cooperative group reads their material/information.

  • The members of the cooperative group decide on 3 to 5 important details to pick from the information they have.

  • The cooperative group decides the best way to present the information to the class.


Step 3: The cooperative groups teach

 

  • Each cooperative group is assigned time to present the information to the class.

  • All members of the group are expected to participate in the presentation.

 

Step 4: Assessment

 

  • The teacher decides the best way to assess the student’s learning. He can ask questions or use any other forms of assessment.


C. Expert Jigsaw


Step 1: Preparation of the information

 

  • The teacher prepares the information to be studied.

  • The teacher divides the information into four equal parts.

  • The teacher labels the four parts: #1, #2, #3, #4

 

Step 2: Distribution of the material

  • In each cooperative group, everyone is assigned one part of the information. In this case, each cooperative group has four members.

  • Individuals read their information and summarize it.

 

Step 3: Formation of Expert Groups

 

  • At this level, students form expert groups.

  • Individuals from different cooperative groups with the same material label form an Expert Group. Example: all individuals who have received material #1, leave their cooperative groups and come together to form Expert Group #1, those with material labeled #2 form Expert Group #2, those with material labeled #3 form Expert Group #3, and those with material labeled #4 form Expert Group #4.

 

Step 4: Expert groups work

 

  • The members of the expert group read the information they have.

  • The expert group members decide on 3 to 5 essential points to learn from the material.

  • The expert group members decide on the best way to teach this information to their home cooperative groups.

 

Step 5: Experts teaching

 

  • At this stage, students return to their home cooperative groups.

  • Each student is given a certain amount of time to present his information to his home cooperative group members.

 

Step 6: Assessment

 

  • The teacher decides the best way to assess the student’s learning.

  • The teacher can ask questions or use any other forms of assessment.


References


Abobaker, R. M., Sulaiman Alamri, M., Jamaan Alshaery, B., & Hamdan-Mansour, A. M. (2023). Impact of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning Strategy on academic achievement and opinion among Nursing Students. Journal of Holistic Nursing and Midwifery, 33(1), 43–51. https://doi.org/10.32598/jhnm.33.1.2344


Aronson, E., & Bridgeman, D. (1979). Jigsaw Groups and the Desegregated Classroom: In Pursuit of Common Goals. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 5(4), 438–446. https://doi.org/10.1177/014616727900500405


Johnson, F. O., Lawal, R. F., & Dada, F. H. (2023). Effect of Smartphone-Assisted Jigsaw Cooperative Learning on Students’ Mathematics Self-Efficacy. Brillo Journal, 2(2), 63–79. https://doi.org/10.56773/bj.v2i2.32


Nnamani, O., Hadebe‐Ndlovu, B. N., Okeke, C. I., & Ede, M. O. (2023). Effect of Jigsaw and Team Pair‐Solo cooperative learning strategies on interest in Basic Science of primary school children with visual impairment. Psychology in the Schools, 60(7), 2430–2446. https://doi.org/10.1002/pits.22866


Sihite, M. S. R., Huda, N., Harahap, I. H., Agustanti, A., & Andriati, N. (2023). The implementation of cooperative model’s jigsaw with react strategies to improve connection mathematic ability of students. Pendas : Jurnal Ilmiah Pendidikan Dasar, 8(1), 2020–2033. https://doi.org/10.23969/jp.v8i1.7858


Thenu, D. M., Wambrauw, H. L., Budirianto, H. J., & Damopolii, I. (2022). Improving student learning outcomes through the use of Jigsaw learning. Inornatus: Biology Education Journal, 3(1), 24–31. https://doi.org/10.30862/inornatus.v3i1.410

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